An Open Letter to Garrison Kellior

Written in reply to “Stating the obvious” 
Dear Mr. Kellior,
Last week my son and the other kids in Mrs. Hughes’ 1st grade class room participated in Read Across America.  He has a certificate, signed by the Cat in the Hat himself , mounted on a piece of red construction paper hanging on his bedroom wall to prove it. You didn’t visit my son’s classroom. I haven’t asked him, but I think he’s OK with that. I know I’m OK with it, because your humor-based bigotry is something that I want to keep him away from for as long as possible. 

 Like you, I grew up in a mixed gender marriage in a time and place where it seemed that everyone had a garage, a yard and lots of Tupperware. Back in the day, couples who divorces were shunned,women who had children out of wedlock were shamed, and homosexuals were unheard of.  A lot has changed since then.  Not only do we have telephones that we carry in our pockets, but we, us white middle class children of the suburb, have learned that even in the glorious days of our youth, there were people who didn’t have yards, or garages or Tupperware. Heck! There are still people in the world who don’t!

“Serial monogamy has stretched the extended family to the breaking point”? If gay men “want to be accepted as couples and daddies, however, the flamboyance may have to be brought under control”?  Are you suggesting that we go back to the closet and the days of shame? That people stay in marriages that just seem to drag on and on, one grey day after the next, for the sake of the children? 

The kids that you saw last week, the kids from Africa and Asia, the kids who speak Spanish at home, the kids who have two moms or two dads, or a mom and a step dad, or a gran, are growing up in a world far wider then we could have imaged when we were children. And, if us parents do our jobs right, that wider world can be a place of love, acceptance and grace far greater then we ever dreamed possible. For my part, when my son and I are at the history center and we walk by your glass case, I’m going to do what I can to keep him from pressing your button. He doesn’t need to hear your story. We’ve working really hard to get past it.

2 responses to “An Open Letter to Garrison Kellior

  1. “For my part, when my son and I are at the history center and we walk by your glass case, I’m going to do what I can to keep him from pressing your button. He doesn’t need to hear your story. We’ve working really hard to get past it.”

    –Fantastic!

  2. very interesting, but I don’t agree with you
    Idetrorce

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